How to market your content to potential clients

May 25, 2017

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Taking the time to produce marketing content can be difficult. It’s not always easy to consistently come up with topics and ideas and over time you can start to feel like you’ve come to a dead-end. If you’ve been doing it for a while however, you know as well as I do that dead-ends are just an illusion. We always manage to come up with new ways to push forward; and so with all that work, of course we’d like to think that our readers are absorbing everything we have to offer, right?

That’d be nice, but I’m afraid not. I challenge you to ask a friend, that you know follows your publishings, how many times on average they actually read every word of your content. There’s a good chance you won’t like what they have to say; but try not to get discouraged. Time is valuable to people and sometimes it’s easier to just skim through the paragraphs rather than reading everything on the page.

In marketing, we are always trying to formulate new ideas and strategies to keep our techniques up-to-date; so much so that we can easily lose touch of the basics. One fundamental key principal of content marketing is BENEFITS over FEATURES.

Let me explain… Benefits are just as they sound. They are the value that the potential customer would receive from your services should they decide to become a client. For example, one way you could pitch a benefit is to say something like, “10% Increase in profitability guaranteed!” This is a benefit, and with all things that benefit us, we tend to give them more of our attention. In order to keep your content’s target audience interested and engaged, you need to make sure the benefits your services offer are standing out as much as possible.

Features are kind of like your credentials, so-to-speak. One example of a feature would be something along the lines of, “With over 25 years experience” or “Recipient of Best Firm Award”. These are features, and although they earn you credibility with whom you’re trying to market yourself to, they don’t necessarily capture the attention of the reader. Now, this is not to say features are bad. In fact, including them is very important; but you don’t want to make your pitch focused so much on your features that your benefits don’t get the chance to stand out.

As a rule of thumb, I like to recommend a ratio of 80/20 in favor of benefits. This way, you have a good percentage of features in your content so that your target audience can see what you’ve accomplished for others like them, but they also stay engaged in what you’re trying to sell them. Benefits are the key to getting people to pay attention to you. If you miss the opportunity to capture their attention, you miss the opportunity to serve them as your client; and nobody likes missed opportunities.


Don’t make the first impression your worst impression!

December 11, 2014

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You’ve heard the saying “there’s no second chance to make a first impression”, and they’re right. A client’s first impression of you and your business is extremely important. But how do you make a good first impression? Here are 5 ways to avoid making your first impression your worst impression:

  1. Your real first impression isn’t in person.  If you’re meeting a client face-to-face, there’s a good chance they did some research. Their first impression of you came from your website or social media sites. It’s critical that you keep your online presence updated and accurate so clients feel confident about you before you even get a chance to say hello.
  2. Do your homework. Before you meet face-to-face with a client, make sure to look at their company website and personal social media. You can be sure your client looked you up, and you want to do the same. Having some basic information about the company and personal interests shows that you know your stuff.
  3. Look the part. Appearance is everything. Well not everything, but it’s definitely important. Looking put together leaves a better first impression. Not only will the client take you more seriously, you’ll feel more confident about yourself.
  4. Have a plan. Before your meeting, set some goals for yourself. Not just business goals, but social goals as well. Make an agenda for the meeting so you know where to focus your time. You’ll feel more prepared and less nervous if you know what you’re going to say.
  5. Be yourself. No one wants to have a meeting with a robot (unless it was an actual robot, that would be pretty cool.) Don’t get strait to business, make a connection. Don’t wait too long to start the meeting, but take the first 30 seconds to a minute to say hello, shake hands, and small talk before getting into it. This establishes trust, which is definitely a plus in a business relationship.

Follow these steps, and you’ll be sure to make your first impression a great one.

How do you make a good first impression?


Move your marketing off the back burner

April 17, 2014

BurnerWhy does marketing your business always seem to get put on the back burner? We get it, you’re busy! But these easy marketing strategies won’t take much time and they’re well worth what you’ll get out of them.

1. Network – You’ve heard it before but we’ll say it again, you’re never going to make connections if you don’t interact with new people. Networking is a great opportunity to meet potential clients in a casual setting, but you still have something to gain even if you’re not with your target market. Simply putting a face and personality to a name goes a long way in the referral business. Sometimes it really is all about who you know.

2. Go digital – In today’s world, people turn to Google first for everything. Potential clients are going to look you up, there’s no doubt about it. But will they like what they see? Take a little bit of time to update your website, add information to social media or post new content. If they can’t find anything about you online, they’re probably not going to contact you for business.

3. Host – Sometimes you have to give a little to get a little. Hosting a brief, educational event for your target audience will get them interested in what you have to say and offer. You don’t have to give them a free session, but offering a little advice about common mistakes or current issues every person is facing will show them how good you are. Next time they find themselves in trouble, you’ll be the one they turn to for help.

4. Send information – Even people you’ve met three or more times will likely forget who you are. Periodically (we suggest regularly) send a brief newsletter to your clientele and prospects. It will remind them of you. This could be a simple hello, a review of what you’ve been working on, new things you have to offer, or maybe something calendar relevant. Whatever you want to say, send it out so clients will have it to use, to pass along, or to keep in mind for the future.

So maybe you don’t have time to put your entire focus on marketing right now, but start with these simple steps and you’ll be off to a good start. Marketing is essential for new business, and you don’t want to miss out!

What moves are on your marketing short list?

Three Point Marketing offers marketing support for professional service providers such as financial planners, attorneys, and accountants.


Social Media: More Than Just a Website

February 4, 2014

Company sites have been all the rage in online marketing throughout the 2000s.  They can provide sufficient details on services, mission statements, FAQs, contact information and more with the simple search of a company name.  While these websites still readily host all of this content, new platforms have recently taken the front seat in marketing strategies of business firms and organizations.Business-Social-Media

Companies are devoting more time, people and resources to having a social media presence through blogs, Twitter, LinkedIn and more.  The interactive nature of these sites and applications allows businesses to connect with existing, and prospective, clients on a deeper level to create a tighter relationship.

Focusing too much on your website?

We’re not saying your company site isn’t important.  Clients still want to have all your information available to them in one, easy to use location.  But that doesn’t mean they don’t want to be able to interact with you as well.

So, why not just give clients a call or send out traditional snail mail? 

Professionals born into this digital generation have no hesitation utilizing social media in business practice, but not everyone sees the benefits.  In order to keep a traditional organization afloat in an increasingly technological world, companies need to be wherever their clients are.

Think your clients aren’t using social media?

It may seem that companies you connect with still aren’t on social sites, however these online databases are the quickest growing channels of communication. Read the following statistics on the use of social media and its impact on business practices.

  • 76 percent of companies are using social networking for business objectives.
  • 55 percent of Americans aged 45-54 now have profiles with one or more social networking sites.
  • Every second, two new members join LinkedIn.
  • 53 percent of Twitter users recommend services or products through their account.
  • Close to 50 percent of legal firms reported that blogging and social networking helped produce leads for new clients in 2012.

The direction in which today’s business world is heading suggests that companies need to set an online presence.  Social media can be one of the simplest, quickest, most economical ways to promote your services – and to get others to do it for you.  If you want to dive in, but aren’t sure exactly what you’re doing, a good place to start might be finding out which social media sites your clients, competition, and similar or partner organizations use.

Have you joined in on today’s social media marketing? If not, are you ready to get started?

Three Point Marketing offers marketing support for professional service providers such as financial planners, attorneys, and accountants.